They were Here in the West

IMG_8281

“They were Here in the West” by BMTC 18×24 edition of 50, BFK Rives Creme, French Black ink

©2013 BMTC Studio Artist Brennyn Carmen

Artist Statement:

My background is culturally diverse, with strong Japanese, Spanish, German, and Welsh pioneer influences. I often felt tension in trying to figure out where I fit in, wishing just to identify as “American.” Moving state to state, however, allowed me to explore diverse aspects of American culture and appreciate the subtleties of identity in ordinary scenes. Many of my observations were glimpses of cultures that were not uniquely American, but were pieces of the mosaic that make up modern American identity.

Contentment came in embracing that “American” means piecing it all together, and finding validity in this! cultural mix.There is a natural tension in this pursuit which I explore this in my intaglio by addressing formal issues, and balancing the conflict of light versus dark, texture and line, and especially process to create this tension. I allowed chemicals to do what they will, and I would work with the rest of the image to make it complete and my own. It has been a journey through my artwork and exploring this concept that I believe I have reached a balance in both my identity and image making as an intaglio artist.

-BMTC

5×7 Card Tutorial

1

You will be using Adobe Illustrator or an (.ai). You will be saving it as a (.pdf)

To start, click “New” under “File” (not new template) and you will do the following below:

2

Make sure you change the bleeds and size of the document to these

If you at any time need to change the document, it’s listed under “File” “Document set up”

3

This will lead you to a box just like the one above to change bleed marks and size. You can also do a landscape too by changing the “5” and “7” or clicking on “Orientation”

Place your image first, then your text on top.

4

The red line is the “Bleed” and the black line is the “Actual” postcard. This is where it will be cut.

After the image is set, create a text box to go on top.

5

The text tool is a giant “T” to your left.

To change the text at all, and even to make it go vertical or horizontal, right click or hit control as you click.

6

“Rotate” will let you rotate the whole text box until it is vertical!

7

When you are done, click save as.

 

This part is really important for the alpha graphic people. You might want to save an (.ai) for any changes you want to make in the future as well. Alpha Graphics needs the (.pdf)

8

Click the adobe PDF

Make sure you go to “Marks and Bleeds” on the left with the peach color bar. Hit a check on “Trim Marks”and “Registration Marks”

9

If it doesn’t already, make sure that bottom half that says “Bleeds” is checked on “Use Document Bleed Settings”

Save it like this, and then save an (.ai) for yourself, and place it on a USB! The Alpha Graphics people will know what to do with your PDF!

Good Luck!

Favourites!

My awesome Illustrator & Printmaking friend does some beautiful watercolour illustration with ink!

Screen shot 2013-04-22 at 9.10.13 PM

Victoria-Riza.com

She has a knack for beautiful paper and color combinations when doing her fashion illustration, check it out:

-1

One of my favourites comes from her BFA, I kept this postcard invite on my fridge!

Scan 5

I recently sent her a print-made map she wanted, and am so happy she loved it! I really encourage keeping connections and trading artwork, I am going to pick out a print from her! Good ol’ fashioned print exchanges! There’s nothing that can replace it!

Screen shot 2013-04-22 at 9.11.52 PM

Follow her at:

http://victoriahydeart.tumblr.com/

and her website:

victoria-riza.com

 

Ramirez

Another BFA piece called “Ramirez”

bfa2

“Ramirez” by BMTC 16×20 edition of 50, BFK Rives Creme, French Black ink

©2013 BMTC Studio Artist Brennyn Carmen

Artist Statement:

My background is culturally diverse, with strong Japanese, Spanish, German, and Welsh pioneer influences. I often felt tension in trying to figure out where I fit in, wishing just to identify as “American.” Moving state to state, however, allowed me to explore diverse aspects of American culture and appreciate the subtleties of identity in ordinary scenes. Many of my observations were glimpses of cultures that were not uniquely American, but were pieces of the mosaic that make up modern American identity.

Contentment came in embracing that “American” means piecing it all together, and finding validity in this! cultural mix.There is a natural tension in this pursuit which I explore this in my intaglio by addressing formal issues, and balancing the conflict of light versus dark, texture and line, and especially process to create this tension. I allowed chemicals to do what they will, and I would work with the rest of the image to make it complete and my own. It has been a journey through my artwork and exploring this concept that I believe I have reached a balance in both my identity and image making as an intaglio artist.

-BMTC